My Next Book!

  • April 2, 2016 2:55 pm

I’m excited to announce that I’m busily working on my next book, MODERN PERILS OF COUNTRY LIVING. Here’s the blurb on the sale from Publisher’s Marketplace. Memoir is so different than what I’m used to writing, though of course The Complete Organic Pregnancy and The Conscious Kitchen were deeply rooted in my own life. It’s slated to be released in Spring 2017. Excited to share this–funny, I think–tale with you.

THE MODERN PERILS OF COUNTRY LIVING by Alexandra Zissu
Non-fiction: Parenting
CONSCIOUS KITCHEN author Alexandra Zissu’s THE MODERN PERILS OF COUNTRY LIVING, the story of uprooting from NYC’s West Village to upstate New York seeking a more wholesome environment in which to raise kids, and how it’s not at all what she imagined, at all, to Ann Treistman at Countryman Press, by Sharon Bowers at Miller Bowers Griffin.

Hudson Valley Hookup aka Tick Checking in The New York Times

  • August 13, 2015 5:25 pm

I not-so-recently relocated to the Hudson Valley. Here we have a deep well and are surrounded by the farms that grow our food, among other amazing comforts. As a lifelong urban girl, my time in the woods has been hilarious, wonderful, frustrating, trying. I am such a fish out of water, but I no longer think about nature deficit disorder! There are many things–big and small–that scare me up here. Put me on a subway at 3am no problem, but show me a tick crawling across my 2-year-old and aaaaa! Tick-borne disease is on the rise. It’s terrifying. Neighbors and friends all around me are diagnosed weekly. It’s not just Lyme. It’s co-infections and more. Some of them are suffering chronically. So we all endlessly tick check. Day in and day out. Night in and night out. Searching and searching. And we wear a lot of white stuff tucked into white socks. I realize not everyone actually tick checks. So I decided to write about it — why to, how to, who else is checking (Jill Kargman from Odd Mom Out, fashion designer Cynthia Rowley, and some Kardashians, among others). The result is here, in The New York Times. Tonight make sure to check you and yours!

(Also, very pleased to have entered Hudson Valley hookup into the Times lexicon.)

Moms Clean Air Force Posts

  • July 29, 2015 1:57 pm

I’ve been doing some writing again lately for Moms Clean Air Force. So glad to be part of their impressive mission. My latest posts cover links between air pollution and autism, and an essay on why I find protecting my children from toxic chemicals to be empowering (if annoying — I’d rather the government truly protect us and I could get back to more fun parenting tasks).

If you’re not yet familiar with MCAF’s work, check them out!

Recent Writing

  • June 4, 2015 12:35 pm

After a few years of mainly working with clients, I’m back to doing some writing for various publications. I’m still loving working with clients, but was missing being a journalist. Check out some of my latest posts on some of my favorite topics (I am microbiome obsessed!):

Self Beat Bloat, Lose Weight, and Feel All-Around Amazing By Making This Change / Five new books center around the one diet trick you probably haven’t tried yet: paying attention to your gut health.

Refinery 29 The Ultimate Grocery Store Shopping Guide for 20-somethings

Refinery29 6 New Ways to Get Plastics Out of Your Life — And Why it Matters

Yahoo! Style 5 Ways to Stylish Nails Without the Guilt

Yahoo! Style The Best Eco-Fashion to Celebrate Earth Day

Yahoo! Style The 9 Best Eco-Friendly Beauty Products

I’m not on my website as much as I mean to be (sound familiar?). But I am on Facebook and Twitter at least once a day, so come join me at either place.

I’m Back on Mondays with Marlo

  • March 2, 2015 9:10 pm

I had the exciting chance to go back on Marlo Thomas’ show and answer questions about everything from organic food on a budget to what three common household chemicals are surprisingly toxic. Check it out.

Chatting Green with Marlo Thomas

  • September 5, 2013 9:53 am

Alexandra Zissu and Marlo Thomas

I had great time talking about everything green living and environmental health with Marlo Thomas a few weeks back for her Huffington Post show, Mondays with Marlo. Check it out here.

Healthy Child Healthy World

  • April 2, 2013 8:40 pm

I’m still not entirely back up to speed since having a baby in December. Such is life. That said I’m thrilled and delighted to be working with Healthy Child Healthy World. While I’m not back to posting here on my own blog, I am writing over on their blog if you’re in the mood to read something recent.

Maternity Slow Down

  • January 11, 2013 12:50 pm

As of mid-December I’m home getting to know my newborn and working, writing, and posting less (or not at all). I should be back up and running at some point in February. If you send me a question for a Q&A in the interim, I will file it for then.

Happy 2013!

Q&A: New Year’s Resolution Ideas

  • December 26, 2012 9:25 am

Question:

Alexandra,

New Year’s is here and I’m looking for simple ways to green my life. Do you have some ideas?

Thanks,

Ron

Answer:

Hi Ron,

Happy almost New Year! I’m glad to hear about the changes you want to make for 2013. Simple steps add up, especially if we all take them. One easy way to go green is via the food you buy, cook, and eat. In my book The Conscious Kitchen, I have ten food commandments I suggest. Perhaps you will find resolution ideas in them.

1. Eat less meat. When eating beef, seek out and choose grass-fed. Other meat and poultry should be carefully sourced.

2. Just say no to bottled water. Drink (filtered) tap instead. This will save money, too.

3. Buy local organic or sustainably farmed fruits and vegetables. Don’t forget that coffee and tea come from plants, and wine is made from grapes; choose sustainable versions.

4. Eat only the least contaminated sustainably harvested wild or well-sourced farmed seafood.

5. Always consider packaging when shopping. Choose items packed in materials you can reuse or that can be recycled in your municipality. Buy bulk items instead of overpackaged goods. Always shop with reusable bags.

6. Cook at home. Often. And serve on reusable dishware, not disposable. Clean with eco-friendly products.

7. Avoid plastic as often as you can.

8. Try composting, even if you live in a city, or a house without a yard.

9. Whenever possible, reduce energy use in the kitchen by choosing efficient appliances, cooking methods, and dishwashing practices; don’t leave appliances plugged in when not in use; ask your electric company for alternative energy sources like wind power.

10. Spread the word. Educate everyone you know. Green your office kitchen, your kids’ school kitchen, your friends and relatives’ kitchens. Make noise; together we can make a huge difference.

Happy 2013!

Alexandra

Q&A: Chemical Flame Retardants?

  • December 19, 2012 9:43 am

Question:

Alexandra,

I recently sent an email to members of my family as they shop for holiday and baby gifts, including fleece footed pjs. I’m sending part of it to you below. There has been some backlash. Was this overkill? I did ask them to try not to take it personally. I just don’t want to expose the baby to harm.

Here is some info on flame retardants that I think important to share. When thinking about buying gifts, please keep in mind that if there is a label on the product that indicates that it is in accordance with California state regulation 117, or is made with any type of foam in conjunction with the product not being labeled as organic, or is labeled as “flame retardant,” please think twice before buying it.

Thanks for your thoughts.

Sarah

Answer:

Dear Sarah,

This is a real concern. The overkill part largely depends on your family.

There are flame retardants basically in all foam products (they’re made from petroleum and so are very flammable), even fleece pajamas. It is good common sense not to go out of your way to purchase and place unneeded foam around your baby, though it is unavoidable in things like car seats. It’s of course more important to have a car seat than to minimize exposure to flame retardants in foam, in terms of risk factor.

Flame retardants are in such wide use that these things are found in the blood/bodies of almost all Americans, which is why it’s a good idea to expose yourself to less of them if and when you can, especially since at the moment they’re almost impossible to avoid in couches and other upholstered furniture (though there are some indications this may get better soon). So it’s easier said than done to avoid entirely, but you can minimize. They’re in this computer I’m typing on, too, by the way.
How you speak to your own family is largely an issue of personality and pre-established relationships. I have ways of addressing these issues individually with the various members of my own family. I do know that feelings get hurt when anyone rejects a well-intentioned present. And tempers flare when gift givers are told what they bought or what they want to buy is toxic. It’s an odd thing. At this point my own family members are very careful about what they buy for us and our daughter. I know it’s a burden for them. Some let me know this more than others. Some just do what they want. I have smiled and thanked countless people, then returned or exchanged my fair share of foam-filled things and fleece everything over the years. No one noticed (that I know of), and no hard feelings. Just saying.
If you’re looking for some good reading to share, The Chicago Tribune has been working on a great investigative series on flame retardants this year. Well worth emailing around and then it’s the reporters doing the lecturing, not you. Which is a good thing.
Best,
Alexandra